The best books on and about diversity

23 August 2016

The Olympics may be over, but we’re still clinging onto our summer. And with temperatures set to soar this week, we’ve asked the team for their latest must-reads on or about diversity.

From novels to neuroscience, read on to find your next deckchair, sofa or commute companion. You’ll also find our top three books on managing equality and diversity and unconscious bias.

We’d love to hear your recommendations, too. Tweet us or head to our LinkedIn page to join the EW Community, and tell us the diverse read we shouldn’t be without.

 

Our Diversity Book Recommendations 1 - Views from EW


Books on Diversity and Unconscious Bias: Celia’s Top Three

 

  1. Demystifying Diversity: A Handbook to Navigate Equality, Diversity and Inclusion – Jiten Patel and Gamiel Yafai
  1. The Inclusion Revolution Is Now: An Innovative Framework for Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace – Maura G. Robinson
  1. The Inclusion Imperative: How Real Inclusion Creates Better Business and Builds Better Societies – Stephen Frost

Celia Evans, EW Group Leadership and Talent Development Specialist

 

Our Diversity Book Recommendations 2 - Views from EW

 

Rachael’s Pick: Drive by Daniel H. Pink

“Daniel H. Pink’s provocation is that our motivation to do a job well has fundamentally shifted. More and more of us are seeking enjoyable and fulfilling work. We only have to look at start-ups like Escape the City to see how true this is.

“Pink argues that the usual ‘carrot and stick’ approach to rewarding good work with money, and poor performance with punishment, no longer work. They can, in fact, have the opposite effect: dampening motivation and diminishing performance. It’s a well-written (i.e. not too dry) business psychology book – one which has interesting implications for leaders in terms of building inclusive cultures.”

Rachael Wilson, EW Group MD


Jane’s Pick: The Green Road by Anne Enright

“I’ve just read this and loved it. It’s a novel about an Irish Catholic family, largely set in the 1970s and 1980s. The poverty, religious tensions and the way in which sexuality and gender play out were gripping. And the associated themes of shame, strength and struggle are starkly, beautifully described.

“The characters inevitably come together as adults and we see their very different journeys along the way. Not many laughs to be had, but there is warmth and love as well as pain – honestly!”

Jane Farrell, EW Group Chief Executive


Teresa’s Pick: The Social Animal by David Brooks

“The Social Animal’s an amazing book. It gives you lots of information on all the latest psychological research and insights from the world of neuroscience. And all in the really digestible form of a story.

“Brooks also really tells you about how life chances are created and what it takes to overcome disadvantage, whatever form it may take.”

Teresa Norman, EW Group Diversity and Talent Management Specialist

 

Our Diversity Book Recommendations 3 - Views from EW

 

Ruth’s Pick: The Year of the Runaways by Sunjeev Sahota

“I’ve just finished this amazing novel about Indian immigrants trying to work under the radar in the UK. It was hard and fabulous, and made me very much appreciate the relative ease of my life.”

Ruth Overton, EW Group Workplace Inclusion and Inclusive Leadership Trainer


Geoff’s Pick: The DI Zigic and DS Ferreira Series by Eva Nolan

“I would recommend Eva Dolan’s three detective novels which are great holiday reads. The first two – Long Way Home and Tell No Lies – explore the criminal underbelly of Peterborough’s European migrant population, while the last and most recent work, After You Die, tackles the thorny issue of assisted dying.

“All three novels are seen through the eyes of a male Detective Inspector whose parents are from Serbia and a female Detective Sergeant who is the daughter of Portuguese immigrants.”

Geoff Adams-Spink, EW Group Disability and Diversity Specialist


Mandy’s Pick: How To Be Both by Ali Smith

“This is a surprising and joyful novel which richly deserved all the prizes and plaudits it won, proving that great literature can also be a great read. It brings together themes of art, parent/child relationships, gender non-conformity, and courage through two stories that span Renaissance Italy and present-day Cambridge.

“Luck dictates which story your edition of the book will begin with – but you’re in for a treat either way.”

Mandy Hetherton, EW Group Executive Coach and Facilitator

To tell us your favourite diverse read, tweet us or head to our LinkedIn page.

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